April 12th, 1915

Received by James Padgett.

Washington D.C.

I am here, your old Prof:

I am very happy and am glad to say that I can see that you are, too. I want to say that I am prepared now to write you as I promised, and anytime that suits you I will be glad to do so. Well, that will suit me very well, and I will be here, and ready to give you the result of my best thoughts, and hope that you will find my writings interesting and profitable.

Yes, she is happy and is here. She says that you are very dear to her, and wants you to know that you are doing a great good to the poor unfortunate spirits who come to you for help. She is willing to help too, if you desire her to.

Yes, says Mrs. Salyards, that will be perfectly proper, and she will not hesitate to respond and do what she can. So she says, with all her love, she wishes you much happiness and success.

Well, I tried to help them, and some of them listened to me and tried to take my advice, and are now striving to obtain the Father's Forgiveness and Love. Some were not so easily impressed, but I believe that they will ultimately try to do as I advised them. Oh, it is a great and good work that you are doing, and we are helping you to do.

Yes, I heard the conversation between him and Mr. Riddle, and I enjoyed it very much. It was quite a revelation to me, as I could hardly conceive that a spirit, with all the surroundings that exist here, could be so self-opinionated, or believe that he had such an all comprehensive mind. It was certainly interesting as I heard him discourse on the wonderful knowledge which he possessed, or thought he possessed. Such minds, I doubt not, are very difficult to convince that there may be some little knowledge that they do not possess.

I will not write more now, but will say goodnight.

With all my love and best wishes for your happiness, I am

Your old Prof,

Joseph H. Salyards