November 1st, 1915.

Received by James Padgett.

Washington D.C.

I am here, Von Moltke.

Let me tell you that I am a German and have heard what the little Corporal (Napoleon!) said, and that, while he was a great general when on earth, yet as a spirit general he is a failure, for his dear France will never see the glory that he predicts for her. She is at her best now, and when her armies commence that great advance that Napoleon speaks of, they will be met by the Germans and annihilated.

I also visit the headquarters of the Allies and know their plans, and I know that Napoleon is there advising them; but he is behind the day of improvement in armament and guns and ammunition, and he is also behind the times in his advice. He has found his Waterloo, and never again will he rise to become the great leader of armies. But strange to say, he thinks that he is the same wise, sagacious and tactical general that he was on earth. But he will find his mistake.

The Germans will surely be victorious in this great war, and the French will sue for peace, and with them their Allies as well.

It is no use for me to write further on this matter, because I could only repeat what I have said; but you, my friend, put into your memory and at the end of the war call forth this prediction: The Germans will become the victors.

Your friend,

Von Moltke

(The old strategist of the German armies when France fell.)