December 6th, 1915.

Received by:James Padgett

Washington D.C.

I am here, Your own true Helen:

I merely want to say that you and Dr. Stone are very foolish men to neglect your soulmates, as you have been doing lately. We have been waiting to have you call for us, but you do not express a desire for us to write a short letter before you go to bed, to let you know that we are here and that we love you.

Now do you think that this is right, when we are with you every night anxiously waiting for you to say, sweethearts come and write us a long letter tonight, and tell us that you love us with all your hearts and souls. I know that many men who, if they had such sweethearts as you two have, would not rest content to let the night go by without praying for us to write them, that we thought at least just a little bit of them. Now what shall we do in the way of punishment for your neglect?

I said, "Tell my soulmate to give me a kiss."

Well, he has solved the problem. We will not give him the kiss but will make him go to bed without his usual kiss, and then he will realize that his punishment is just what he deserves, and he will not neglect us again. But Mary says, No indeed, she will not punish her soulmate in that way, because if she did, she would be punishing herself more than she would him, and besides, she could not write unless you would consent to write for her, and she knows that many nights when he visits you he hopes that he may receive a message, but as he sees that you are at work he does not make his request, and consequently, she is not going to punish him for what he can't help.

Just see what a foolish little sweetheart she is. So you see that spirit sweethearts and mortal sweethearts, when they are females, do not differ very much. And she says that now that the Ray is open she will write just a little if you will help her, and I seeing what a foolish little girl she is, and knowing that she will not be happy unless she can say a word to him, I tell her to go ahead and let the Doctor see what an easy little sweetheart she is. She says that she doesn't care what I think, that she knows that the Doctor won't think that she is foolish, but will just be delighted to have her write. So prepare now to hear words of burning love.

Mary now writes:

Well, I will tell him that I love him with all my heart and soul, and I don't care if Helen is laughing at me, for I do love him and I have the right to tell him so, and he must believe me, for I am with him nearly all the time and want him to know it.

So tell him, also, that when he is not thinking of me I am thinking of him and trying to help him with all my powers and love. And say particularly, that I am so glad to see that the Love of the Father is entering his soul more and more, and that as a consequence, he and I are coming closer together in our love and in our soul development.

I know that you are tired but I could not help writing this, for I have been waiting so long to write him and tell him this. But I will not trespass longer, and will say that I thank you and love him as only a soulmate can love. So goodbye.

Helen (Mr. Padgett's wife and soulmate) resumes:

Well, sweetheart, I enjoy so much seeing Mary express her love for the Doctor for it makes her so happy, and I love her so much that I will do everything in my power to make her happy.

I will write you before you go to bed.

Your own true and loving,

Helen