March 19th, 1916

Received by:James Padgett

Washington D.C.

I am here, Maurice Smith.

Let me say a word too. As Hay had the opportunity to write I would like to do so also. I will not detain you long as I merely want to let you know that I am alive. Well, I am not very happy, and am in darkness and suffering and don't see any prospect of relief.

I noticed that as he left you he was much happier than when he commenced to talk to you, and I thought that maybe you said something to help him, and that you might help me, also. I know you will, if you can.

I saw some spirit who was very bright looking, but I could not see distinctly or recognize him, and I suppose it was some acquaintance of Hay, that you had something to do with his meeting. Well you surprise me for I did not know that Mr. Riddle was that kind of spirit. I thought that he was like the rest of us lawyers, who all seemed to be grouped together in darkness and suffering, and some say, hell; but I don't like that word and I shall insist that I am in the darkness only, and, besides, if it were hell, I should see the devil and the fires, etc., which I have never seen.

A long time ago, as it seems to me, I saw Taggart, it must have been when he first came over; but I have not seen him for some time, as he appears to have left us.

Well, you astonish me some for I have never thought that you could help a spirit, and in fact I am so astonished at the knowledge that I can communicate to you in the way that I do, that I am ready to believe most anything, and I assure you that I am very willing to follow your advice if there is any hope of my changing my condition for a better one.

Yes, I see some spirits, and they certainly are bright and beautiful - they must belong to another sphere, for I don't often see spirits of that kind, and when I do they don't seem to be quite natural. But, as you have called my attention to them, I see that they are real, and they seem to have looks of love and kindness about them. And now, I see one who is not so bright or beautiful as the others; but he seems to be happy and does not have the darkness surrounding him, and he comes to me and says: "Hello, Maurice, I am glad to see you," and lo, and behold, it is Taggart. Well, don't this beat the devil! Who would have thought that he could look as he does? And he says he is very happy and wants to help me, and will tell me the way to get into a condition similar to his own, and if I want to argue the matter he is ready to do so.

The same old Taggart, ready for an argument. I wonder what he has to say? He says come with him and he will tell me, and I must go.

So thanking you, I will say goodnight.

Your old friend and fellow lawyer,

Maurice Smith