March 19th, 1916.

Received by:James Padgett

Washington D.C.

I am here, Helen:

Well, you have had some of your old lawyer friends write you, and I was glad of it, for they seemed to be happy in doing so.

The last one was poor Lipscomb, and he imagined that he was intoxicated, but, of course, he was not. He thought so himself; and as you have heard, "thoughts are things."

Well, I am very sorry for him. I have tried once or twice to help him, but I am afraid that I will have to wait some time before I can make any impression on him. He is so earthbound, and that accursed appetite seems to have such a hold on him that he is completely dominated by it. But time, as you say, will help him.

Well my own dear, I was with you tonight at church and you realized it while the choir was singing, for I could see and feel that your love was flowing to me, and I was very happy.

The preacher was very entertaining and his argument on the negative of the proposition was all right, for God's Love is open and waiting for everyone who may seek it, and no one will be deprived of it because of any supposed unpardonable sin. And his second proposition was, in a way, true also; but the conclusion that any man may by his own will and shutting of his soul desires to the influence of the spirit damn himself eternally is wrong. All will be saved either in the spirit world or the Celestial Heavens ultimately. Such sermons, while not expositions of the full truth, yet may do some good by awakening the hearers to a realization of their actual condition and need for the things of the spirit.

Well sweetheart, I must not write longer tonight as it is late. So with all my love, I will say, believe that I love you and am with you in all your worries and enjoyments.

Your own true and loving,

Helen