January 24th, 1917.

Received by:James Padgett

Washington D.C.

I am here, William B. Cornelies.

Let me write and tell you that I have listened to your conversation tonight, and have been much interested in what has been said, and especially in that part of your talk where you spoke of the Divine Love and the transformation of the soul into what you called the Essence of the Father.

Well, I desire to say that I have considered spiritual or religious matters for a long time and the ideas that you have expressed are new to me, and open up to my investigation a new field of the possibilities of the soul in its progress. It may seem strange to you that I, who have been in the spirit world for a great many years and been interested in the investigation of what I considered spiritual truths should not have heard of this doctrine of the transformation of the soul into the Essence of God, but it is a fact. Of course, I have come in contact with many variety of spirits, and some who claim to possess this Divine Love, but I never entered into any conversation or discussion with them as to this question, as I was satisfied that they were spirits who had imbibed on earth the orthodox Christian beliefs, and were still possessed of the same, and that their claims to what they called this love, were based upon what might be called their beliefs in an imaginary, unsubstantial something, which satisfied them, but which was not worthy of the consideration of spirits who had given their whole lives in the spirit world, to the study of spiritual truths, based upon the laws of the spirit world as they became known to the intellects of men, capable of studying and analyzing these laws, and the truths that they contained.

I have many associates who devote their time and thought to the investigation of these laws and the truths that are deducible from them, and who are men, or rather spirits, who do not accept any thing or declaration as a truth that cannot be proved by scientific principles and tests.

We, of course, are not of the sentimental or transcendental kind, but confine ourselves to the pure and exact investigation of the laws that govern what we perceive to be the actual condition of spirit substances.

But your conversation has made an impression on me, and perceiving that you men are earnest in your discussion, and seem to have a firm conviction as to the truth of the fact that the souls of men and spirits may be transformed by this love, with which I am not acquainted, I commenced to think that there may be some spiritual truths that lie beyond the scope of the investigations that I and my companions may have given to spiritual truths. And so thinking I should like to ask you some questions as to these matters, and if possible, learn if as a truth, there exists such a thing as this Divine Love as contradistinguished from the love that we all possess to a greater or lesser degree. So if you are inclined to answer my questions I should like to propound to you a few at this time.

Well I have heard what you said, and I have asked if Prof. Salyards is present, and a beautiful intellectual looking spirit comes to me and says that he is the Prof. and that he knows what you said and that it will give him great pleasure to answer my questions and to give me a full explanation of what this Divine Love is and the manner in which it transforms the soul into the Essence of the Father. And he directs my attention to a number of bright spirits, and says that they are living examples of the fact of the existence of this Love, and of the effect that it has on the souls of spirits who possess it. And he says further, that as the appearance of the spirit body discloses the condition of the soul, that if I will look carefully I will find an appearance in all these spirits that I do not find in spirits who do not claim to possess this love. And upon a careful scrutiny I realize that what he says is true.

He invites me to a conversation, and I will go with him.

I thank you for your consideration and will bid you goodnight.

Very respectfully Yours,

William B. Cornelies

I was an inhabitant of England.